Login | Help

banner ad
5

Covering banking: Localizing the beat

Find the lawyers. Just about every major law firm in town will have banking and finance experts who work with institutions on recapitalizations, mergers and acquisitions, regulatory issues and the like. Lawyers have a direct line to the bankers in your community, and although it’s highly unlikely they’ll break client confidentiality to help you, they do know the important issues affecting the institutions. They also can be knowledgeable on new regulations, and most likely they harbor strong opinions about the prospects for troubled banks in your region.

Likewise, consultants and accountants can be helpful sources. When I started on the banking beat, I asked a banking accountant to walk me through an income statement and a balance sheet so that I could familiarize myself with line items I hadn’t encountered on previous beats. Chances are there is someone in your region who would be willing to do the same for you.

local banking beatTalk to borrowers. Small businesses in your region know when it’s harder to get credit. Their experience may indicate that a particular bank in town is in trouble, or that the economy overall is weakening. Maybe you cover other large companies based in your area. As a matter of your non-bank beat reporting, ask the CFOs and treasurers of those companies who they bank with; go to a Bloomberg terminal to find the lenders and terms of big loans made to those companies. Know which banks are key in your market.

Know your regulators. The federal regulators – the Fed, FDIC and OCC – have local offices in many regions. Get to know the people in those offices. State-chartered banks (as opposed to national-chartered banks) also are overseen by state banking regulators, and they can be valuable sources.

SPECIFIC EXAMPLES OF TERRIFIC STORIES

  • From the Macon Telegraph, here is a very thorough story about a local bank failure/takeover situation. You might not get as many column inches as this writer did, so look through it and think about what would matter most to you if you were a customer of the bank that failed, or a nonprofit in town that relied on the failed bank for sponsorships and support, or any other segment of your readership that might have questions about how things will work under the new ownership. Typical questions include: Why did the failed bank run into trouble? What’s going to happen to the rate on my CD? What’s going to happen to the local management team? What are the prospects for other banks in our area? Expansion a goal of CertusBank, which took over Atlantic Southern.
  • I came across the following piece in the St. Petersburg Times when I was doing some research for a story about banks making acquisitions in the U.S. South. This article provides a behind-the-scenes look at BB&T’s takeover of the failed Colonial Bank, which went into FDIC receivership in 2009. This was a large deal, likely larger than most failures we’ll see from this point on in the cycle, but it’s instructive for anyone who wants to understand what goes into a failed-bank takeover, and how a bank that gets shut down on a Friday night can still open for business on Monday. When Colonial Bank fell, BB&T swooped in, becoming Florida force.
  • For reporters interested in investigative work, the bank industry offers plenty to chew on. My American Banker colleague Jeff Horwitz obtained documents leading to a terrific piece about a previously undisclosed investigation by the Inspector General of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (since referred to the Department of Justice). Large U.S. banks are alleged to have taken $6 billion in kickbacks from mortgage insurers in the past decade. Banks Took $6B in Reinsurance Kickbacks, Investigators Say
  • The Reynolds Center itself has some terrific tips on handling the banking beat, along with some call-outs of stories that represent the genre well. Reynolds Center blogger Melissa Preddy had some good advice to share in her recent posts about the federal Small Business Lending Fund, a.k.a. son of TARP. Another recent post covered the very broad topic of borrowing, from the retail consumer level on up to the federal government level. Both posts are full of links to other helpful resources. You can find all of Melissa’s posts collected here.Find more examples of good business reporting from Rosland Gammon, also a Reynolds Center blogger, whose posts are gathered here. Lastly, check out the banking category on the Reynolds Center’s website. It includes posts from Melissa and Rosland, as well as round-ups from elsewhere in the industry.

About the Author

Heather Landy is the editor in chief of American Banker Magazine. She previously was a reporter for the American Banker daily newspaper, covering large banks and an array of governance, risk, accounting and regulatory issues affecting the sector. Before joining American Banker, she was a special correspondent to The Washington Post, covering Wall Street during the height of the financial crisis. In 2007 she won a Gerald Loeb Award, one of the highest honors in business journalism, while reporting on the retail industry for The Fort Worth Star-Telegram. She began her career at Bloomberg News, and received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism.

Comments (5)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Anonymous says:

    "Todayu2019s Tip: Use the minutes of bank board meetings on file with the FDIC to gather information on bank failures."

    Where on the FDIC site are these available?

  2. Anonymous says:

    …or do you mean "file a FOIA request to see the minutes…"?

Leave a Comment

1) Register to join the community & comment or 2) Quick comment
Username: Username:
Email: Email:
Password:
Verify Password:
or 3) Login if you already have an account
Comment:

Switch to our mobile site