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Cassandra Nicholson

Cassandra Nicholson is responsible for organizing Webinar/workshop registrations and materials. She assists in the marketing of free training events and works directly with attendees and presenters.

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What’s Next in Covering the Affordable Care Act: Self-guided training

Photo: Mercy Health

“What’s Next in Covering the Affordable Care Act” was originally held on Aug. 6, 2014.

After the launch of healthcare.gov, individuals will be anxious to see whether premiums go up when open enrollment, and for the first time, small businesses will be able to shop on an online federal exchange.

Also, large businesses will be required to provide affordable insurance to most of their workers for the first time.

In this one-hour webinar, Tami Luhby, who covers health care for CNNMoney, helps journalists identify local story ideas and gives them a road map to possible sources to develop them.

YOU WILL LEARN

  • How to identify local story ideas as to how the Affordable Care Act is affecting the delivery of health care for consumers, providers and insurers.
  • How to access sources online and in-person to report local stories related to the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

YOUR INSTRUCTOR

Tami Luhby is a senior writer at CNNMoney.com, where she covers health care, including the Affordable Care Act. Previously, she covered personal finance for Newsday. Before joining Newsday, she worked at Crain’s New York Business and American Banker. She also worked as a metro reporter at The Home News Tribune and at the Asbury Park Press in New Jersey.

SELF-GUIDED LESSON

Check out the resources below for resources and tips on covering the Affordable Care Act in your local community.

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Tracking Tribal Cash and Influence to Washington: Self-guided training

NAJA-LogoThis training was originally held during the Native American Journalists Association’s (NAJA) annual conference in Santa Clara, Calif., July 10, 2014.

In Washington, money helps make just about every decision — every law that is passed, every regulation revised and every new or discarded agency policy.

From issues unique to Native Americans, such as tribal sovereignty and Bureau of Indian Affairs programs, to broader issues – natural resources management, environmental stewardship and immigration reform – that may have unique implications for Native communities, money is often the deciding factor.

In the last two decades, tribes and Native communities have begun asserting themselves in Washington like never before. Dozens of tribes have made use of new economic prosperity to hire powerful lobbyists and write campaign checks that make lawmakers pay attention.

Photo by Frank Swift

While many groups have been marginalized or shut out of the influence game by the rising cost, the Center for Responsive Politics data show that the pace of tribes’ and Native communities’ spending in Washington has only quickened. While much of the impetus for this new power in Washington is related to casino gaming, the conversation being driven by tribal money now goes far beyond that one issue.

This free training provided journalists with tips on how to tap into the world of money and influence in Washington, and how decisions affecting tribes and Native communities are being influenced — and who is trying to influence them.

YOUR INSTRUCTOR

Russ Choma is the money-in-politics reporter at the Center for Responsive Politics’ OpenSecrets.org.

His series, “Blown Away: Tracking stimulus grants for renewable energy,” found that more than 80 percent of the first $1 billion in grants to wind-energy companies went to foreign firms, and many renewable-energy projects that received stimulus cash were built well before President Obama was even inaugurated.

SELF-GUIDED LESSON

Check out our resources below for tips, resources and best practices for covering the money trail from Native tribes to Washington.

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What’s Next in Covering the Affordable Care Act at EIJ: Nashville, Sept. 5

The Particulars

When:
3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 5, 2014

Instructor:
Tami Luhby,
health care reporter
at CNNMoney

Where:
Gaylord Opryland
Resort & Conference Center

2800 Opryland Drive
Nashville, TN 37214

Host:
This training will be held
during the SPJ/RTDNA
Excellence in Journalism
Conference
.
Conference registration is
required.

Click here to register
for the EIJ conference.

Photo: Mercy Health

Get ready to cover open enrollment this fall for both individuals and small businesses under the Affordable Care Act.

A year after the launch of healthcare.gov, individuals will be anxious to see whether premiums go up when open enrollment starts Nov. 15, and for the first time, small businesses will be shopping on healthcare.gov to buy the coverage for their employees.

Tami Luhby, who covers health care for CNNMoney, will help you identify local story ideas and give you a road map to possible sources to develop them.

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN

  • Identify local story ideas as to how the Affordable Care Act is affecting the delivery of health care for consumers, providers and insurers.
  • Access sources online and in-person to report local stories related to the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

 

Tami Luhby

YOUR INSTRUCTOR

Tami Luhby is a senior writer at CNNMoney and covers healthcare, income inequality and other economic issues. Luhby previously wrote about personal finance for Newsday and banking for Crain’s New York Business.

A Bronx native, she teaches at Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and does marathons and triathlons in her spare time.

ABOUT THE PROGRAM
This training session is sponsored by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism.

For more information about the Reynolds Center, please call 602-496-9189.

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Branding for Journalists at EIJ: Nashville, Sept. 5

The Particulars

When:
9:30 to 10:30 a.m.
Friday, Sept. 5, 2014

Instructor:
Robin J. Phillips,
Reynolds Center
digital director

Where:
Gaylord Opryland
Resort & Conference Center

2800 Opryland Drive
Nashville, TN 37214

Host:
This training will be held
during the SPJ/RTDNA
Excellence in Journalism
Conference
.
Conference registration is
required.

Click here to register
for the EIJ conference.

You’ve heard about journalists and personal branding for a few years.

And if you’re like most journalists, you thought: Oh, that’s just a buzz phrase. Isn’t branding just marketing? Isn’t branding just selling out?

Some of that is true, but the reality is that you are branding yourself, whether intentionally or not. You are creating your brand.

This session explores ways you can grab the wheel and take control. Bring a laptop or tablet and get started fine-tuning your brand.

This training session is part of the 2014 Excellence in Journalism Conference. Conference registration is required. | Register for EIJ here.

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN

  • How to identify what your brand is now
  • Ways other journalists manage their online images
  • How to better leverage social media (including where you need to be—and where you don’t)
  • How to get started: Identify your strengths, know your goals
  • How to determine your personal brand promise
  • Practical ways to take charge of your image online

YOUR INSTRUCTOR

Robin J Phillips

Robin J. Phillips

Robin J. Phillips joined the Reynolds Center in August 2009, after working as online community manager for azcentral.com, the Web site of The Arizona Republic in Phoenix.

She has also served as deputy business editor at The Republic and Newsday, as well as editor for BusinessWeek Online’s small business channel.

Robin teaches a course on the Business & Future of Journalism at the Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications, was an adjunct professor of new media at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York and has presented at various journalism organizations on the use of social media as a reporting tool.

ABOUT THE PROGRAM
This training session is sponsored by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism.

For more information about the Reynolds Center, please call 602-496-9189.

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Data Journalism 101: SPJ/RTDNA, Nashville, Sept. 4

The Particulars

When:
9 a.m. to noon
Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014

Instructor:
Michael J. Berens,
Pulitzer Prize-winning
investigative reporter
for The Seattle Times

Where:
Gaylord Opryland
Resort & Conference Center

2800 Opryland Drive
Nashville, TN 37214

Host:
This training precedes the
SPJ/RTDNA
Excellence in Journalism
Conference
.

Cost:
$25

Click here to register.
Conference registration
is not required.

Photo by Craig Chew-Moulding

Behind the winners of most major investigative awards including the Pulitzers is a database – or maybe even a slew of databases.

Yet number phobia has kept many of us from fully exploiting databases as a tool in our reporting skill set.

Fear no more! In this session for those with no previous database experience, Pulitzer winner Michael J. Berens of The Seattle Times demystifies data and shows you how to find and mine databases for unique enterprise stories.

You’ll learn how to obtain public databases, import data from the Web, create your own databases and analyze data using basic spreadsheet commands. In addition, you’ll learn how to find the names behind the numbers that will bring your story to life.

With your new database skills, you’ll be able to break stories that other media outlets don’t have, as well as make yourself more competitive in the job market. Bring your laptop for this hands-on session.

Register for the workshop at the Excellence in Journalism Conference’s event page. Conference registration is not required.

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN

  • How to obtain public databases.
  • Ways to import data from the Web.
  • How to create your own databases and analyze data using basic spreadsheet commands.
  • And how to find the names behind the numbers that will bring your story to life.

YOUR INSTRUCTOR

Michael J. Berens

Michael J. Berens

Michael J. Berens is a reporter for The Seattle Times and a winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting.He previously worked for the Chicago Tribune and The Columbus Dispatch, where he began as a copy boy in 1981.

Berens’ work has received dozens of national awards, including multiple honors from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers; the National Press Club; the White House Correspondents Association; and Investigative Reporters and Editors; and Associated Press Media Editors. Additionally, his work in recent years was recognized with a Gerald Loeb Award; Worth Bingham Prize for Investigative Journalism; and Selden Ring Award for Investigative Journalism.

He was the 2011 bronze award winner in the Reynolds Center’s Barlett and Steele Awards for Investigative Business Journalism. Berens is a frequent journalism trainer for various media-related organizations and is a former adjunct professor at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University.

ABOUT THE PROGRAM
This training session is sponsored by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism.

For more information about the Reynolds Center, please call 602-496-9189.

 

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Info Session: Online Graduate Certificate in Business Journalism

 

Interested in applying for the all-new online graduate certificate in business journalism?

We provided an interactive info session and introduced prospective students to our nationally-recognized faculty members. Check out the archived materials below.

Offered at Arizona State University by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism and the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, this 15 credit-hour program includes five graduate-level courses taught solely online. Check out the official announcement and review the program’s FAQ page.

The Reynolds Center has trained more than 20,000 journalists worldwide since 2003, and our long-time home at ASU’s Cronkite School – one of the top journalism schools in the United States – means we’re able to take our business journalism training to the next level with a fully-accredited graduate certificate. Click here for more information on how to apply to the graduate certificate program.

Andrew Leckey, Reynolds Center President and Endowed Chair at the Cronkite School, will teach the first course in August, “Issues in the Coverage of Business and the Economy.”

While explaining why journalists should consider a graduate certificate in business journalism, Leckey said, “Quality coverage of people and their money is something that does not go out of style.”

The deadline to apply for the first Fall 2014 course is July 31.

Applications will continue to be accepted throughout the academic year on a rolling basis. Click here for more information on how to apply for graduate admission.

VIDEO INFO:

Below you’ll find recording of the information session and an introduction to the sessions by Andrew Leckey, Reynolds Endowed Chair in Business Journalism.

Info Session: Online Graduate Certificate in Business Journalism at Arizona State University from Reynolds Center on Vimeo.

Course Teaser: Online Graduate Certificate in Business Journalism at Arizona State University from Reynolds Center on Vimeo.

 

Steve Doig, Knight Chair in Journalism, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Arizona State University, CAR

Steve Doig, Cronkite School

 

What the info session covered:
  • The institutions: Arizona State University, the Cronkite School and the Reynolds Center
  • A brief introduction to the new online graduate certificate program
  • The courses offered and what to expect throughout the program
  • An introduction to our esteemed instructors

 

Robin J Phillips talking

Robin J. Phillips, Reynolds Center

 

Your instructors:

Steve Doig joined the Cronkite faculty in 1996 as the school’s first Knight Chair in Journalism following a 23-year career in newspaper journalism. An expert in computer-assisted reporting, Doig was part of an investigative team at The Miami Herald that won the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service for an analysis on how weakened building codes and poor construction contributed to the devastation of Hurricane Andrew.

Robin J. Phillips joined the Reynolds Center in August 2009, after working as online community manager for azcentral.com, the Web site of The Arizona Republic in Phoenix. She has also served as deputy business editor at The Republic and Newsday, as well as editor for BusinessWeek Online’s small business channel.

Robin teaches a course on the Business & Future of Journalism at the Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications, was an adjunct professor of new media at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York and has presented at various journalism organizations on the use of social media as a reporting tool.

ABOUT THE PROGRAM

This info session is sponsored by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism.

If you have any questions about the center’s training, please email Cassandra Nicholson or call 602-496-9189.

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Mergers & Acquisitions 101: Self-guided training

Image by Enrique Burgos

“Mergers & Acquisitions 101″ was originally held on June 3, 2014.

Facebook and Instagram. Starbucks and Teavana. Verizon and Vodaphone. Mergers and acquisitions (M&A) make for some of the most exciting stories in the 21st century newsroom.

Deals can occur any day, anytime nationally, regionally or locally. In the fourth quarter of 2013, there were 4,052 M&A transactions, down from 6,104 in the fourth quarter of 2012, according to S&P Capital IQ. And Credit Suisse is predicting a boom on M&A activity in 2014.

When you set out to cover a deal, you need to know the landscape, the language, the players, and what to ask.

During this hourlong session, you’ll learn the basics needed to tackle an M&A story on deadline. You will come away with the essential language, know-how, questions, story ideas, and tools necessary to write a basic M&A news story for your news organization.

YOU WILL LEARN:

  • Where to find M&A stories regionally and nationally
  • How to access the necessary SEC filings, and where to find the top online research sites to turn to for deal stories
  • Who are the key players and sources in a deal, and what questions do you need to ask them
  • What are the follow-up stories to pursue after breaking the news of the deal



YOUR INSTRUCTOR

Amy Wu wrote the Movers & Shakers column at The Deal LLC from 2006 to 2008. She spent 14 years in the newsroom and as a reporter at Time magazine, the San Francisco Chronicle and the Rochester Democrat & Chronicle before moving into academia and teaching journalism. She has held news-writing workshops for SmartTone and for the Hong Kong Government. A native New Yorker, she earned her master’s degree in journalism at Columbia University and is working on her doctorate at the University of Maryland’s Philip Merrill College of Journalism.

SELF-GUIDED LESSON

Check out the resources below for tips on covering one of the most popular aspects of local and national business journalism.

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Shadow Money: Unraveling Political Nonprofits’ Spending: Self-guided training

Photo by Nick Ares

“Shadow Money: Unraveling Political Nonprofits’ Spending” was originally held on May 14, 2014.

Politics is a big business. Not only is big money publicly shelled out to get candidates elected, but hundreds of millions are spent on a secret political game – the shadow money world dominated by mysterious, politically active nonprofits. These groups take advantage of loopholes in the Internal Revenue Service’s rule book to build complex webs of entities – linked together by money – to win political races and keep the source of the money secret.

During this free, one-hour session from the Reynolds Center and the Center for Responsive Politics, you’ll learn where to find how this money is being spent on the issues important to your beat and how to begin unraveling the web of organizations behind it all. This training will touch on the basics of IRS and Federal Election Commission oversight and how these nonprofits stay under the radar.

YOU WILL LEARN:

  • How the Citizens United decision in 2010 by the U.S. Supreme Court allowed not only for-profit corporations and labor unions, but also politically active nonprofits, to flood unlimited amounts of money into the political system.
  • How politically active nonprofits, which spent $336 million on federal campaigns alone in 2012, operate under and outside the radar of the IRS and FEC, spending secret donor money from the federal to the local level.
  • What clues to look for when tracking a politically active nonprofit. This includes what key information on 990 forms, incorporation documents and disclosure forms will be most helpful in your reporting.

YOUR INSTRUCTOR

Russ Choma is the money-in-politics reporter at the Center for Responsive Politics’ OpenSecrets.org. His work has appeared in several publications including the Investigative Reporting Workshop, Nieman Watchdog, Politics Daily, Grist.org and MSNBC.com. His series, “Blown Away: Tracking stimulus grants for renewable energy,” found that more than 80 percent of the first $1 billion in grants to wind-energy companies went to foreign firms, and many renewable-energy projects that received stimulus cash were built well before President Obama was even inaugurated.

SELF-GUIDED LESSON

Review the session materials below to track the spending trail of political nonprofits.

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Investigating Government Contractors: Self-guided training

Photo by the Oregon Department of Transportation

Investigating Government Contractors was originally held April 22, 2014.

Contractors have literally become a fourth branch of government. Name a government function, and it’s a good bet that it’s being carried out by a contractor, including national security, as we’ve seen with NSA leaker Edward Snowden.

Some contractors, such as Lockheed Martin, get more federal dollars than several government agencies combined.

In this one-hour webinar, learn how to track local and national government spending on contractors in public databases and see examples of stories that have or could be done.

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN

  • How to find or FOIA public databases on spending on contractors at the federal and state levels.
  • What to look for in identifying stories on contractors.
  • How debarment of contractors works — or not.

YOUR INSTRUCTOR

Ron Nixon is a domestic correspondent in the Washington Bureau of The New York Times, where he has worked since 2005. He is the former computer-assisted reporting editor at the Minneapolis Star Tribune and a former training director for Investigative Reporters and Editors.

SELF-GUIDED LESSON

Review the session materials below to infuse your local government reporting with an emphasis contractor coverage.

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