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Reynolds Staff

The Reynolds Center, created through generous grants from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation of Las Vegas and operated by ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, is dedicated to improving the quality of business and economics coverage through training programs for business reporters and editors.

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Penn State to host Reynolds Visiting Business Journalism Professor in 2015

Reynolds Visiting Professor Program:
HOW TO PARTICIPATE

Learn how to become a Reynolds
visiting business journalism professor
or to bring a visiting professor
to your university.

The Pennsylvania State University will host a visiting business journalism professor in spring 2015 under an Arizona State University program funded by the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation.

This is the fourth year the foundation has funded business journalism professors at universities to encourage development of stronger business journalism education. The $1.67 million grant is administered through the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism at ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

“One of our goals in funding this grant was to broaden the reach of the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism into other institutions across the country,” said Steve Anderson, president of the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation.

Micki Maynard Central Michigan visiting professor

Reynolds Visiting Business Journalism Professor Micki Maynard taught at Central Michigan University in spring semester 2013.

“This year, another grantee will join the existing cadre of institutions that will be able to enhance and expand their ability to teach the principles and skills necessary to train the next generation of business journalists.”

The five-year program will ultimately create 11 visiting professorships at 11 different schools.

Marie Hardin, associate dean in Penn State’s College of Communications, said, “This grant gives us the boost we need to develop a strong business reporting program, and having a Reynolds visiting professor here for a semester will help us develop a curriculum that will be forward-thinking, relevant and appealing to students.”

She said the school will soon begin identifying potential candidates for the position. | Prospective professors apply here.

In addition to teaching courses in business journalism in the spring 2015 semester, the visiting professor helps establish partnerships with local media and contributes to BusinessJournalism.org. The host schools, which also are eligible for funding for business journalism internships and visits by business journalists, provide space as well as technical and administrative support for the professors.

All schools in the program commit to continue teaching business journalism after the grants conclude.

The first business journalism visiting professors taught in spring 2012 at Colorado State University, Grambling State University, the University of South Carolina and Texas Christian University.

In 2013, visiting professors taught at Central Michigan, Elon and Louisiana State universities. In spring 2014, visiting professors are at California State University, Fullerton, and the University of Oklahoma.

A final visiting professorship will be awarded for spring 2016. | Schools apply here by Feb. 18, 2015.

ABOUT THE REYNOLDS CENTER
Since 2003, more than 20,000 journalists have learned to cover business better through free training from the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism. It is part of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University’s Phoenix campus. Cronkite offers the first online graduate certificate in business journalism through the center. The center also provides free regional workshops and webinars, as well as daily tips on how to cover business better on its website, BusinessJournalism.org. It is funded by the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, a national philanthropic organization founded in 1954 by the late media entrepreneur for whom it is named. Headquartered in Las Vegas, it has committed more than $145 million nationwide through its Journalism Program.

 

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Questions and answers about Cronkite’s online graduate certificate in business journalism

Business Journalism Certificate Program Q&A

Starting in August 2014, Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication will offer the first online graduate certificate in business journalism through its Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism. Below are answers to frequently asked questions about the certificate.

To apply, visit bizjournalism.asu.edu.

  • What is the graduate certificate in business journalism? This 15 credit-hour program consists of five courses in business journalism and is taught fully online by the nationally recognized faculty and staff of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.  It is the only online graduate certificate program in business journalism in the United States. Information about the program is at bizjournalism.asu.edu.
  • Why the Cronkite School? The Cronkite School is among the top journalism schools in the country and has deep expertise in business journalism. It is home to the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, which developed and administers the certificate program, as well as the home of the national Society of American Business Editors and Writers.
  • What is the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism? Since 2003, the Reynolds Centerhas offered training in business journalism to more than 20,000 professional journalists globally via workshops and webinars.

    MORE INFORMATION

    Arizona State University
    Online Graduate Certificate:
    Business Journalism

    Questions and answers
    about the certificate

    Email Cassandra Nicholson
    or call 602-496-9189.

    Apply here

    It also operates the world’s premier website for journalists seeking to cover business better: BusinessJournalism.org. The center has been based at the Cronkite School since 2006 and is funded by generous grants from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, a national philanthropic organization founded in 1954 by the late media entrepreneur for whom it is named. Headquartered in Las Vegas, it has committed more than $145 million nationwide through its Journalism Program.

  • What will I learn? You’ll learn best practices in covering companies, markets and the economy. And you’ll emerge better equipped to find compelling business stories, analyze financial and economic data, and investigate business leaders and operations. Even if your beat isn’t business, you’ll gain a thorough understanding of how money drives decisions in government, politics, the arts, sports and other areas.
  • Whom is the program for? The certificate program is designed for students and professional journalists who want to be better prepared to cover business and the economy.
  • Why business journalism? Demand for business journalists continues to be strong, and salary levels remain healthy. GorkanaJobs.com, a website that specializes in job postings for business journalists, regularly lists more than 100 openings each week in both the United States and in the United Kingdom. Demand for business journalists is expected to grow as the global middle class – the primary consumers of business news – almost triples to 5 billion consumers by 2030.
  •  Who will teach the classes? Classes will be taught by Cronkite’s award-winning faculty, including Andrew Leckey, former syndicated investment columnist and CNBC anchor, who holds the Reynolds Endowed Chair in Business Journalism at the Cronkite School; and Steve Doig, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter who is an internationally known data journalism expert. Other classes will be taught by the staff of the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, which has extensive experience training business journalists around the world.
  •  What five courses are required for the certificate?
  1. Issues in Coverage of Business and the Economy. Understanding from a journalist’s perspective the financial markets, economics, company statements, banking, credit markets, real estate and global competition, emphasizing significant issues and differences in coverage.
  2. Special Topics: Critical Analysis of Business Journalism. Understanding the process of researching and reporting basic business news stories, including utilizing social media and social strategy. Identifying the key elements of stories on a public company, a small business, a consumer issue, an earnings report, court records, demographic information, a CEO interview, financial statements, a nonprofit, an IPO and a merger.
  3. Better Business Storytelling. Identifying ideas, cultivating sources, gathering scenes and sensory detail to construct narratives, finding real people, interviewing, reporting stories for multiple platforms, writing short and fast.
  4. Data in Business Journalism. Using Excel to analyze public databases; using ratios to understand financial statements and Form 990s; localizing economic indicators; researching stocks, bonds, derivatives, currencies and commodities; creating simple data visualizations.
  5. Investigative Business Journalism. Identifying and researching an investigative business story, using public records, including SEC documents, and databases. Cultivating sources and getting people to talk to you. Organizing and bulletproofing your story. Producing a detailed pitch memo for an investigative business story.
  •  When will courses be offered? Each course is offered twice during an academic year. Please see Arizona State University’s upcoming academic calendars for planned start dates for these terms. The first course – Issues in the Coverage of Business and the Economy — will be offered in Fall A 2014.
Number Title Instructor Title Terms offered
MCO 550 Issues in the Coverage of Business and the Economy Andrew Leckey Reynolds Endowed Chair in Business Journalism, president of the Reynolds Center and former Fulbright Scholar Fall A, Spring A
MCO 598 Special Topics: Critical Analysis of Business Journalism Robin J. Phillips Digital director of the Reynolds Center, nationally known social-media strategy trainer and a former editor at BusinessWeek Online Fall B, Spring B
MCO 551 Better Business Storytelling To be announced Spring A, Summer A
MCO 552 Data in Business Journalism Steve Doig Knight Chair in Journalism, internationally known expert in data journalism, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the George Polk Award, and former Fulbright Scholar Spring B, Summer B
MCO 554 Investigative Business Journalism To be announced Summer A, Fall A
  •  How long will it take me to complete the certificate? Each course lasts 7.5 weeks during the school year and six weeks in the summer. The five-course certificate can be completed within six months. You may take the courses in any order, but we recommend beginning with Issues in the Coverage of Business and the Economy.
  •  Do I have to take all the courses in the certificate program? You do to earn the certificate, but you can choose to take individual courses outside the certificate program.
  •  Can credit hours earned in the certificate program count toward completion of an on-the-ground master’s degree at Cronkite? Students interested in pursuing a master’s degree through the Cronkite School should email Cronkiteinfo@asu.edu or call 602.496.5555 for more information.
  • What are the requirements for admission? Applicants must meet the admissions requirements for graduate education at Arizona State University. The GRE is not required, but the following are required:
  1.  A bachelor’s degree:  While the bachelor’s degree can be in any subject, courses in the certificate program presume an understanding of the basics of journalism obtained either through undergraduate study or professional experience.
  2. Grade point average (GPA): Minimum of a 3.0 cumulative grade point average (scale is 4.0=A) in the last 60 semester hours or 90 quarter hours of a student’s bachelor’s degree program. Applicants must submit official transcripts of all college-level work.
  3. English Proficiency Requirement for International Applicants: International students must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and have a score of at least 100 on the Internet-based test (iBT). Students can have their scores submitted to ASU and the Cronkite School by using institution code 4007.
  4. An application fee, which is currently $70 for U.S. applicants and $90 for international students.

For more information on how to apply for graduate admission, go to https://students.asu.edu/graduate/apply

  • What are the deadlines for applications to the certificate program? They are usually about three weeks before classes start.
For admission to: Classes start Submit application by:
Fall A 2014 Aug. 21, 2014 July 31, 2014
Fall B 2014 Oct. 15, 2014 Sept. 24, 2014
ing A 2015 Jan. 12, 2015 Dec. 22, 2014
Spring B 2015 TBD, usually mid-March Feb. 23, 2015
Summer A 2015 TBD, usually mid-May April 27, 2015
Summer B 2015 TBD, usually early July June 11, 2015

 

  • Once I start the program, what do I have to do to remain in good academic standing? You must maintain a GPA of at least 3.0 while earning at least six credit hours per academic year.
  • Whom at the Cronkite School can I talk to for more information? Call Cassandra Nicholson at the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism at 602.496.9189 or email cassandra.nicholson@businessjournalism.org.
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Cronkite’s Reynolds Center offers 1st online graduate certificate in business journalism

Graduate Certificate Business Journalism

Offered totally online by the Cronkite School, the Reynolds Center's graduate certificate starts in August 2014.

To meet the growing demand for skilled business journalists, the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University is offering the first online graduate certificate in business journalism through the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism.

Starting in August 2014, the Cronkite School will offer a five-course, 15-credit-hour certificate taught entirely online by experienced journalists. The online program will include best practices in covering companies, markets and the economy.

MORE INFORMATION

Arizona State University
Online  Graduate Certificate:
Business Journalism

Questions and answers
about the certificate

Email Cassandra Nicholson
or call 602-496-9189.

Apply here

The graduate certificate, which can be completed within six months, is designed for journalists globally who seek expertise in business journalism.

The certificate consists of five three-credit courses:

  • Issues in Coverage of Business and the Economy,
  • Critical Analysis of Business Journalism,
  • Better Business Storytelling,
  • Data in Business Journalism, and
  • Investigative Business Journalism.

Instructors include renowned journalists and teachers such as:

  • Andrew Leckey, Reynolds Endowed Chair in Business Journalism and former syndicated investment columnist and CNBC anchor;
  • Steve Doig, Knight Chair in Journalism, Pulitzer Prize winner and internationally recognized expert in data journalism; and
  • Robin J. Phillips, Reynolds Center digital director, nationally known social-media strategy trainer and a former editor at BusinessWeek Online.

“Media outlets are looking for journalists with the necessary skills and knowledge to produce quality business and economic coverage,” said Cronkite School Dean Christopher Callahan. “This graduate certificate offers extraordinary preparation for careers as business reporters, producers and anchors.”

ABOUT THE REYNOLDS CENTER

Since 2003, the Reynolds Center has trained more than 20,000 journalists on how to cover business better through workshops, webinars and its website, BusinessJournalism.org. The center has been based at the Cronkite School since 2006 and is funded by the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, a national philanthropic organization founded in 1954 by the late media entrepreneur for whom it is named. Headquartered in Las Vegas, it has committed more than $145 million nationwide through its Journalism Program.

ABOUT THE CRONKITE SCHOOL

The Cronkite School is a world leader in business journalism education, offering a specialization at both the undergraduate and graduate levels since 2009. Graduates have gone on to internships and jobs at major media outlets, such as Bloomberg News, Thomson Reuters, CNBC, MarketWatch, MSNBC.com and the Los Angeles Times. Named after the longtime CBS anchor, the Cronkite School has been recognized as a leader and innovator in journalism education by The New York Times, The Times of London, American Journalism Review, multiple journalism foundations and the Federal Communications Commission.

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Reynolds fellow named Grady College Journalism Teacher of the Year

Keith Herndon Grady College

Keith Herndon, Grady College

Keith L. Herndon, a visiting professor at the University of Georgia and a 2013 fellow of the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism’s seminar for journalism professors, has been named Journalism Teacher of the Year at Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication.

Herndon is a visiting professor through at least May 2016 at Grady, where he teaches media management, media ethics, news writing and reporting. He also directs a media leadership program in partnership with the Poynter Institute.

Herndon attended the Reynolds Center’s Business Journalism Professors Seminar in January 2013. Created by Reynolds Center President Andrew Leckey in 2007, the annual four-day seminar has trained more than 100 professors in how to teach an undergraduate course in business journalism.

“Certainly, my ‘branding’ as a Reynolds Fellow added to the credibility of the courses and helped me attract faculty support and quality students,” Herndon said after hearing about the Teacher of the Year honor.

Herndon is not alone in being able to advance his teaching skills by adding business journalism topics.

“An evaluation of the seminars completed last year found that the majority of those attending returned to their campuses and started business journalism courses, which have enrolled 1,600 students,” said Linda Austin, Reynolds Center executive director.

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Best in Business: Bloomberg, NY Times, American Banker, LA Times, ProPublica

SABEW has announced winners in the 19th annual Best in Business competition.

Bloomberg News and its related media outlets, including Bloomberg Markets, Bloomberg BusinessWeek and Bloomberg TV, led with 13 honors.  The New York Times had eight honors; Reuters, seven; American Banker, six; and the Los Angeles Times and ProPublica had five honors each.

FULL LIST of SABEW winners:  2013 BiB Winners’ List

For the first time, the Society of American Business Editors and Writers’ contest, singled out a winner in each category. 

Kevin G. Hall, SABEW president and chief economics coorespondent for McClatchy Newspapers, congratulated the winners who came from a very strong batch of entries.

Awards will be presented during ceremonies on March 29 at the Sheraton Phoenix Hotel during SABEW’s 51st annual conference.

SABEW named Mina Kimes, 28, an investigative reporter for Bloomberg News, as their inaugural winner of the Larry Birger Young Business Journalist prize, honoring journalists under 30 years old.

Reynolds Center’s Training Director Kelly Carr and her reporting partner Scot Paltrow won the News Agencies Investigative category with “Unaccountable,” a Reuters investigation into bureaucratic mismanagement in the Pentagon.  “Unaccountable” earned Carr and Paltrow a finalist spot in the News Agencies Explanatory category. 

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Detecting Corporate Fraud: Self-guided training

This free workshop was originally held on Feb. 26, 2014, preceding the Investigative Reporters & Editors’ NICAR Conference in Baltimore. It then preceded the Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) Spring Conference in Phoenix, March 27, 2014.

You can access all materials from both workshops in this self-guided training.

Learn techniques for digging – with an eye for fraud – into U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filings and other disclosures. Instead of spending weeks scouring aimlessly through hundreds of pages of corporate documents, gain an understanding of what key financial information is available, where to look in the documents to quickly identify trouble spots and how to recognize when crucial details are missing.

Investigative reporters, Theo Francis of The Wall Street Journal and Roddy Boyd of the Southern Investigative Reporting Foundation, led this workshop on covering corporations with an eagle eye.

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN

Examine fundamental methods for inspecting public filings for corporate fraud. This training will help reporters spot red flags in corporate disclosures and understand when to pursue a potential fraud investigation.

YOUR INSTRUCTORS

Theo Francis is an award-winning financial and investigative reporter for The Wall Street Journal, specializing in using regulatory documents to dig into corporate behavior. He has worked for BusinessWeek, footnoted.com, Bloomberg News, the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette and local papers in suburban New Jersey and Southeast Alaska.

Francis has also written for The New York Times’ DealBook, Quartz and NPR’s Planet Money blog, among other outlets.

Roddy Boyd is an investigative reporter and founder of the Southern Investigative Reporting Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing document-driven investigative reporting on publicly traded companies.

His book about the near collapse of AIG, “Fatal Risk: A Cautionary Tale of AIG’s Corporate Suicide,” was long listed for 2011’s Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year. Boyd also edited The Financial Investigator blog.

SELF-GUIDED LESSON
Review the materials below to discover new ways to find investigative stories in SEC filings and corporate disclosures. For additional tips, check out Francis’ guide to key SEC documents.

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Two journalists win Reynolds Center fellowships to SABEW Conference

Jason Frazer

Sam Murillo

The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism has awarded fellowships to two journalists to attend the annual conference of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) in Phoenix March 27-29.

As part of their fellowships, Jason Frazer of WFSB-TV in Hartford, Conn., and Sam Murillo of La Voz Arizona in Phoenix, will also attend the Reynolds Center’s training at the conference. Those sessions include:

  • Detecting Corporate Fraud, 1:30-4:30 p.m. March 27, before the conference starts, with Theo Francis of The Wall Street Journal and Roddy Boyd of the Southern Investigative Reporting Foundation. This workshop is free and open to non-conference attendees, but registration is required.

SABEW Phoenix March 27-29 2014SABEW is also offering 11 fellowships to attend the conference. Details on how to apply for them are on its website, including its Benita Newton fellowship for journalists of color.

Here’s more on this year’s fellows:

  • Jason Frazer is a general assignment reporter for WFSB-TV in Hartford, Conn. After graduating from Columbia University in 2005, he was a management associate for Citibank and later worked as a branch manager for JP Morgan. He carried his interest in business into a new career as a journalist. He was a freelance reporter for WBGO radio in Newark, N.J., and for News 12 TV in New York before working as a general assignment reporter at WROC-TV/WUHF-TV in Rochester, N.Y.; WBNS-TV in Columbus, Ohio; and now WFSB-TV in Hartford.
  • Sam Murillo is a senior reporter at La Voz Arizona, a Spanish-language media outlet in Phoenix. Before joining La Voz eight years ago, he was chief editor/owner of Impulso Arizona News in Phoenix. Earlier in his career, he reported in Baja California and San Luis, Mexico. He also studied communication in Mexico. “I do believe the conference will help me to get a better understanding of economic issues that affect especially minority groups,” he said.

 

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Elon, CMU and TCU students win Reynolds internships in business journalism

Katherine Blunt

Students from Elon, Central Michigan and Texas Christian universities have won business journalism internships as part of the Reynolds Visiting Business Journalism Professors Program. The program, which has placed visiting professors in business journalism on nine campuses since 2012, permits students from those campuses to compete for internships.

The winners, all juniors who will cover business in summer 2014, are:

  • Katherine Blunt, a journalism and history major at Elon University in North Carolina. Blunt, who is from Severna Park, Md., will intern at the Colorado Springs Gazette. “I want to become a business journalist because business plays a central role in the life of every news consumer,” she said.
  • John Irwin, a journalism and political science major at Central Michigan University. Irwin, who is

    John Irwin

    from Westland, Mich., will intern in the Detroit bureau of Bloomberg News. “Just about everything, from how governments operate to how parents save up to send their kids to college and to retire, can be traced back to business and economics,” Irwin said. “Readers have a need to know how their livelihoods are impacted by business.”

  • Daniel J. Salazar, a journalism and political science major at Texas Christian University. Salazar,who is from Austin, Texas, will intern at The Dallas Morning News. “Interning at a place with statewide and national recognition means the world to me,” Salazar said.

Daniel J. Salazar

The Reynolds Visiting Business Journalism Professors Program is funded by a $1.67 million, five-year grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation; it will eventually place visiting professors in business journalism on 11 campuses. The first nine campuses to host visiting professors have been California State University, Fullerton; Central Michigan University; Colorado State University; Elon University; Grambling State University; Louisiana State University; Texas Christian University; the University of Oklahoma, and the University of South Carolina.

The program is administered by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, based at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication on Arizona State University’s downtown Phoenix campus.

The last two visiting professors will teach at different campuses in the springs of 2015 and 2016. Applications for visiting professors are received year-round. The next deadline for universities to apply to host a visiting professor in spring 2016 will be in early 2015.

The first intern under the program, Ryan Osborne of Texas Christian University, worked at The Dallas Morning News in summer 2013.

Students from schools that have hosted visiting professors will compete again for internships in summer 2015 and 2016.

About the Reynolds Center

Since 2003, more than 20,000 journalists have learned to cover business better through free training from the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism. The center offers regional workshops and webinars, as well as daily tips at BusinessJournalism.org.

It is funded by the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, a national philanthropic organization founded in 1954 by the late media entrepreneur for whom it is named. Headquartered in Las Vegas, it has committed more than $145 million nationwide through its Journalism Program.

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Perfecting Personality Profiles: Self-guided training

Photo by Graham Milldrum

The two-day webinar, Perfecting Personality Profiles, was held Feb. 5-6, 2014.

To make your beat coverage more accessible and engaging, focus on people – those in positions of power or influence, and those who consume goods and services, work for wages and pay taxes.

Good profiles go beyond resumes and predictable accomplishments. Done well, they can reveal personality, character and motivation. They bring the people and the passion behind the numbers to life.

In two, one-hour sessions, Pulitzer winner Jacqui Banaszynski explores the characteristics of memorable and accurate profiles, while offering a range of profile approaches that can suit your purpose, publication and audience. She also dives more deeply into the reporting and writing techniques that can help any beat reporter pursue sparkling profiles.

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN

HOUR ONE: The Why, What and Who of Profiles

  • How personality profiles inform and elevate business-beat coverage
  • How to identify good profile subjects
  • The core characteristics of good profiles
  • A range of profile types

HOUR TWO: The How of Profiles

  • Access and sourcing of profiles
  • Best practices of reporting for profiles
  • Effective writing structures for writing profiles
  • Alternative profile approaches and structures

YOUR INSTRUCTOR

Pulitzer Prize-winner Jacqui Banaszynski is the Knight Chair in Editing at the University of Missouri School of Journalism. She worked as a projects editor at The Oregonian in Portland and at the St. Paul Pioneer Press in Minnesota. While at the Pioneer Press, her series “AIDS in the Heartland” – an intimate look at the life and death of a gay farm couple – won the 1988 Pulitzer Prize in feature writing and a national Distinguished Service Award from the Society of Professional Journalists.

Her coverage of the African famine was a finalist for the 1986 Pulitzer Prize in international reporting. Her deadline story from the 1988 Summer Olympics won the national AP Sports Editors contest. She spent 18 years as a beat reporter and take-out writer at newspapers in the Northwest and the Midwest. Banaszynski has also taught at the Poynter Institute, the University of Kansas and the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul. She has served four times as a juror for the Pulitzer Prizes.

Banaszynski, a native of a Wisconsin farm village, is a 1974 graduate of Marquette University.

Additional Training
Banaszynski’s previous webinars for the Reynolds Center include:

SELF-GUIDED LESSON

Review the session materials below for tips on how to infuse your beat coverage with engaging profiles.

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