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Reynolds Week 2014


 

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Day 1: Reynolds Week 2014 – Strictly Financials resources

Jimmy Gentry teaching Financial Statements Reynolds Center

Jimmy Gentry teaches during Reynolds Business Journalism Week 2014. Photo Sean Logan

Below are session recordings, PowerPoint presentations and handouts from Day 1 of Reynolds Business Journalism Week 2014, which consists of concurrent four-day seminars: one for business journalists called Strictly Financials, and one for professors on how to teach business journalism.

The Strictly Financials Seminar fellows, who are professional journalists, studied markets and sources with Jimmy Gentry of the University of Kansas.

Business Journalists as Investigators

Raquel Rutledge, Pulitzer winner and investigative reporter for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, offers tips from her experience in using data for community projects.

Reynolds Business Journalism Week 2014 Keynote: Business Journalists as Investigators with Raquel Rutledge from Reynolds Center on Vimeo.

Session Recordings

 

Handouts (PDF)

 

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Day 1: Reynolds Week 2014 – Business Journalism Professors resources

Cornelius Foote, principal lecturer at the University of North Texas' Mayborn School of Journalism. Photo Sean Logan

Below are session recordings, PowerPoint presentations and handouts from Day 1 of Reynolds Business Journalism Week 2014, which consists of concurrent four-day seminars: one for business journalists called Strictly Financials, and one for professors on how to teach business journalism.

The business journalism professors studied classroom organization and syllabus writing with Chris Roush of the University of North Carolina.

Business Journalists as Investigators

Raquel Rutledge, Pulitzer winner and investigative reporter for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, offers tips from her experience in using data for community projects.

Reynolds Business Journalism Week 2014 Keynote: Business Journalists as Investigators with Raquel Rutledge from Reynolds Center on Vimeo.

Session Recordings

Handout (PDF)

 

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Day 2: Reynolds Week 2014 – Strictly Financials resources

Lily Wu, KAKE TV News reporter in Wichita, Kan. Photo Sean Logan.

Below are session recordings, PowerPoint presentations and handouts from Day 2 of Reynolds Business Journalism Week 2013, which consists of concurrent four-day seminars: one for business journalists called Strictly Financials, and one for professors on how to teach business journalism.

The Strictly Financials fellows continued their exploration of financial statements with Jimmy Gentry, professor and former dean at the School of Journalism and Mass Communications at the University of Kansas; Gary Trennepohl, OKEOK Chair of Finance at Oklahoma State University; and Brian Grow, special enterprise correspondent and editor-in-charge based in Atlanta for Reuters.

Session Recordings

 

Handouts (PDF)

 

 

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Day 2: Reynolds Week 2014 – Business Journalism Professors resources

Melony Alicia Shemberger, assistant professor at Murray State University. Photo Sean Logan

Below are session recordings, PowerPoint presentations and handouts from Day 2 of Reynolds Business Journalism Week 2014, which consists of concurrent four-day seminars: one for business journalists called Strictly Financials, and one for professors on how to teach business journalism.

The business journalism professors studied with the following Reynolds Center chairs: Pam Luecke, from Washington and Lee University; and Alan Deutschman, from the University of Nevada, Reno.

Rob Wells, former Reynolds Visiting Professor in Business Journalism at the University of South Carolina and current (as of January 2014) Ph.D. student and lecturer at the University of Maryland, presented on how to avoid “rookie” mistakes when preparing a business journalism course.

Mark Tatge offered tips for adding multimedia to business journalism courses. Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication Knight Chair in Journalism Steve Doig also presented on teaching data journalism.

Session Recordings

 

Handouts (PDF)

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Day 3: Reynolds Week 2014 – Strictly Financials resources

Foreground: Karin Caifa, senior producer for CNN Newsource. Background: Deirdre Fernandes, business reporter for The Boston Globe. Photo Sean Logan.

Below are session recordings, PowerPoint presentations and handouts from Day 3 of Reynolds Business Journalism Week 2014, which consists of concurrent four-day seminars: one for business journalists called Strictly Financials, and one for professors on how to teach business journalism.

Gary Trennepohl, professor of finance at Oklahoma State University, led Day 3’s Strictly Financials sessions as fellows further explored financial statements.

Session Recordings

Handouts

 

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Day 3: Reynolds Week 2014 – Business Journalism Professors resources

Ellen Dale Russell, assistant professor at Wilfried Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario. Photo Sean Logan

Below are session recordings, PowerPoint presentations and handouts from Day 3 of Reynolds Business Journalism Week 2014, which consists of concurrent four-day seminars: one for business journalists called Strictly Financials, and one for professors on how to teach business journalism.

The business journalism professors continued their exploration of financial statements with Jimmy Gentry, professor and former dean at the School of Journalism and Mass Communications at the University of Kansas.

Session Recordings

 

Handouts (PDF)

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Day 4: Reynolds Week 2014 – Strictly Financials resources

Trennepohl sits in on presenting partner Jimmy Gentry's discussion with Strictly Financials fellows. Photo Sean Logan.

Below are session recordings, PowerPoint presentations and handouts from Day 4 of Reynolds Business Journalism Week 2014, which consists of concurrent four-day seminars: one for business journalists called Strictly Financials, and one for professors on how to teach business journalism.

Gary Trennepohl, professor of finance at Oklahoma State University, led Day 4’s Strictly Financials sessions as fellows further explored financial statements.

Session Recordings

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Day 4: Reynolds Week 2014 – Business Journalism Professors resources

Eric M. Wilson, instructor at Wichita State University. Photo Sean Logan.

Below are session recordings, PowerPoint presentations and handouts from Day 4 of Reynolds Business Journalism Week 2014, which consists of concurrent four-day seminars: one for business journalists called Strictly Financials, and one for professors on how to teach business journalism.

The business journalism professors discussed best ways to jumpstart their business journalism program with Reynolds Center President and Endowed Chair Andrew Leckey.

Arizona State University’s Cronkite School Director of Career Services Mike Wong offered tips on preparing students for internships and leveraging relationships with local outlets to provide career opportunities for students.

The fellows also presented sample lessons, syllabi and resources that could easily be implemented into new and existing business journalism courses.

Session Recordings

Resources and Handouts (PDFs)

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On data, tips, outrage: Pulitzer-winner Raquel Rutledge opens Reynolds Week

Raquel Rutledge Milwaukee

Raquel Rutledge, investigative reporter from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, opened up the 2014 Reynolds Week sessions. Photo: Sean Logan

Pulitzer Prize winning reporter Raquel Rutledge has spent her career uncovering the painful truths behind some of Wisconsin’s controversial news stories. From exposing fraud in the state’s child-care subsidy system to alerting readers why shoddy fuel was making its way past inspections and into their vehicles, Rutledge understands how to pull together stories that take a little digging.

She has worked with the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel since 2004 as part of its Watchdog reporting team and was previously a reporter for the Colorado Springs Gazette for 7 years. Her story, “A Case of Shattered Trust,” about contaminated alcohol wipes earned her a silver award at the 2010 Barlett & Steele Awards.

Rutledge spoke to the 30 fellows at this year’s Reynolds Week about how to scope out and put together investigative stories:

 

  • The best reference book for writers is “The Art and Craft of Feature Writing” by William E. Blundell according to Rutledge. The book was a gift from an editor early on in her career, and she credits it as making a huge difference in her reporting. “It is the bible of writing for anybody who’s interested in the craft of writing. For investigative work. For news breaking news,” she said.
  • Find stories from breaking news, beats and obscure publications. She also says tips from reliable sources are a great thing to follow. “That’s where a lot of our bigger stories originate. A lot of them are from tips,” Rutledge said. It’s important that everyone in a newsroom knows what to do with tips, also, so they don’t get lost.
  • When you have a story idea, know if you should follow through with it. Rutledge says to consider the scope of the problem: How many people might be affected? Can a local angle be taken from a nationwide story?
  • Also, ask yourself if there is an outrage factor. Rutledge said, “For me, it’s something surprising. That’s kind of what motivates me. If I’m curious, if I haven’t heard about it, if I want to know more.”
  • Investigative stories sometimes need to be explained through heaps of data, so don’t overwhelm people with obscure numbers. “You want to know the accurate number, but you still might want to round it just to make it simpler for people to digest,” she said.
  • It’s a good idea to communicate with your editors regularly, but how often is up to you. Rutledge said she looks forward to telling her editor about any twists in her story. She also adds that good editors will remember small details you share with them throughout the process. They can later help you piece together your story because they will be familiar with your topic. “And I love that because then you don’t feel like you’re all alone. You’re collaborating,” she said.
  • Talking to others about your story also could end up helping you write about the topic more clearly. “When you’re sharing it along the way with other people, you’re also learning. You’re hearing what they have to say, how they’re receiving it, what questions they might have about it. It’s actually helping the reporting process…you’re getting feedback from basically talking about it,” she said.
  • Fact check your story with your editor. Rutledge said “Go line bye line, every single fact, every name…‘How do you know it, and where do you find it?’”

Rutledge shared her thoughts and these slides during Day 1 of Reynolds Week 2014.