Donald W. Reynolds National Center For Business Journalism

Two Minute Tips

Covering business: Resources and reading

April 26, 2011

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By Mark Tatge

Tutorials and guides

  • Understanding Wall Street, by Jeffrey B. Little and Lucien Rhodes
  • Barron’s Dictionary of Finance and Investment Terms, by John Downes and Jordan Elliot Goodman
  • The Wall Street Journal Complete Personal Finance Guidebook,  by Jeff D. Opdyke
  • Understanding Financial Statements, by Lyn M. Fraser and Aileen Ormiston
  • Show Me the Money: Writing Business and Economics Stories For Mass Communication, by Chris Roush
  • The Business of Bull-shit – a humorous guide to spin, hype and pretense in the modern world, by Graham Edmonds
  • Live Well on Less Than You Think, by Fred Brock.
  • Math Tools for Journalists, by Kathleen Woodruff Wickham
  • The Wall Street Journal Complete Money & Investing Guidebook, by Dave Kansas
  • Financial Shenanigans: How to Detect Accounting Gimmicks and Fraud in Financial Reports, by Howard Schilit.
  • Freaknomics: A Rogue Economist Explores The Hidden Side of Everything, by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner
  • The New York Times Reader: Business and Economics, by Mark Tatge
  • Making the Most of Your Money, by Jane Bryant Quinn

Good reads

  • The Accidental Investment Banker, by Jonathan A. Knee
  • The Number: How the Drive for Quarterly Earnings Corrupted Wall Street and Corporate America, by Alex Berenson
  • MoneyBall, by Michael Lewis
  • The Predators’ Ball, the Inside Story of Drexel Burnham and the Rise of the Junk Bond Raiders, by Connie Bruck
  • The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power, by Joel Bakan
  • Smartest Guys in the Room: The Amazing Rise and Scandalous Fall of Enron, by Bethany McLean and Peter Elkind
  • Beyond Greed: How the two richest families in the world – the Hunts of Texas and the House of Saud trie
    smartest guys

    d to corner the silver market, by Stephen Fay

  • How Markets Fail: The Logic of Economic Calamities, by John Cassidy
  • The Quants: How a New Breed of Math Whizzes Conquered Wall Street and Nearly Destroyed It,by Scott Patterson
  • Too Big to Fail, the Inside Story of How Wall Street and Washington Fought to Save the Financial Syst em and Themselves, by Andrew Ross Sorkin
  • After-Shock: The Next Economy for America’s Future, by Robert B. Reich
  • The End of Shareholder Value: Corporations at A Crossroads, by Allan A. Kennedy

The classics

  • The Robber Barons, by Matthew Josephson
  • The Intelligent Investor, by Benjamin Graham
  • Reminiscences of a Stock Operator, by Edwin Lefevre.
  • When Money Dies: The Nightmare of Deficit Spending, Devaluation and Hyperinflation in Wimar Germany, by Adam Fergusson
  • A Random Walk Down Wall Street, by Burton G. Malkiel

Mark W. Tatge is an author, professor and investigative reporter who spent three decades as a journalist before joining Ohio University’s E.W. Scripps School of Journalism. Tatge was previously Forbes magazine’s Midwest bureau chief and senior editor in charge of the Forbes’ Chicago operations. He’s a former staff reporter for The Wall Street Journal, Cleveland Plain Dealer, the Dallas Morning News and The Denver Post.

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