Must Read Money Stories for Thursday, Aug. 25

by August 25, 2016

 

“Gawker Media” by flickr user “laughingsquid” CC license CC by-NC-ND 2.0.

Gawker goodbyes.

Gawker.com has met its end. Other Gawker Media Group sites will live on as part of Univision. But the flagship Gawker site is over. Gawker Media founder Nick Denton wrote the eulogy on the site. Elizabeth Spiers, the founding editor of Gawker.com, wrote in the Washington Post. The New York Times’ Farhad Manjoo wrote of Gawker’s influence across the web. And the Hollywood Reporter looked at what Univision hopes to get out of its $135 million purchase of Gawker’s assets.

Right to bargain.

The National Labor Relations board ruled yesterday that graduate teaching assistants at private universities have the right to join a union. The Wall Street Journal reports the ruling opens up the door for graduate students who teach to unionize everywhere. Colleges and universities have argued that graduate students are students first, not employees, and they shouldn’t be able to join a union. The WSJ writes the decision to classify them as workers could raise costs for universities and complicate class schedules.

Student debt defaults.

Defaults on student loan debt are at record highs right now, according to Buzzfeed. That’s even though more borrowers have signed up for federally  sponsored, income-based repayment programs. Buzzfeed writes that it seems the federal government isn’t reaching the right borrowers. That’s partly because the people most likely to default on student loans seem to be those who owe the least.

Airbnb’s impact.

FiveThirtyEight dug into data on Airbnb listings to try to figure out what impact they have on local rents. The analysis shows Airbnb isn’t driving up rents as many of its critics feared. FiveThirtyEight writes that problem may be because Airbnb actually doesn’t have that many listings yet. Even in New York, the total number of commercial rentals listed on Airbnb is only about 2,500. But if Airbnb continues to grow, its impact on local housing markets could grow along with it.