Donald W. Reynolds National Center For Business Journalism

Two Minute Tips

Politics

Politics and the vaping industry

We explored the health risks of vaping and its increasing use among middle- and high-school age students in a post in late April. Since then, the story has taken a

Covering election costs

With the close presidential election in 2016 and races in divided national and state legislatures, special elections have garnered extra attention over the last year. Recently, a special election in

How to stop astroturfing by special interests

One of the covert ways that companies and PR firms affect coverage and influence the public is through astroturfing. Astroturf, as you probably know, is a type of artificial grass

3 stories to report now on the new tax cuts

Many taxpayers saw an immediate increase in their paychecks after H.R. 1, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Bill, became law on January 1, 2018. But they may not be paying attention

Investigating company claims after the tax cut

Immediately after the tax cut passed in December, companies like Walmart, AT&T, Boeing, Comcast, and Wells Fargo began announcing how they would invest in employees and facilities. Many of these

Even genealogical records can provide great clues for business stories. ("Jenkins Genealogy 1939-40, A Sketch of Forebears" by John M. via Flicker, CC BY-SA 2.0)

Surprising sources for business stories

Finding a new source of information is always good for business journalists. There are plenty of obvious ones, including Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Hoovers and Google Finance. To advance your reporting, you’ll want to go

Government information may be harder to access, but diligent investigators have several paths to pursue. (Image by "lucianofiore" via flickr, CC BY 2.0)

New ways to uncover federal agency information

One of the developments impacting business reporters early in the new administration is the accessibility of data and information. Various federal agencies reportedly were put on an information lockdown. While every new

The largest investigation in the history of journalism won the 2016 Barlett & Steele Gold Award. ( Image from Arthur Jones and Shutterstock)

How they did it: “The Panama Papers”

Yesterday evening the 2016 Barlett & Steele Gold Award was awarded to “The Panama Papers,” the massive investigation that revealed Panama as a tax haven through which some of the globe’s dirtiest

Theresa May revealed the timeline for Britain's exit from the European Union. (Photo via pixabay.com)

How business reporters can localize Brexit

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Theresa May, has announced her government will formally begin negotiating its exit from the European Union no later than March. Financial markets panicked and

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