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Reynolds Week 2011


  • ARCHIVE: Blog for Reynolds Week 2011: 30 fellows, 4 days of intensive study in business journalism
    Two sets of 15 fellows will attend separate, all-expenses-paid seminars Jan. 4-7, 2011, at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication in Phoenix.

    Reynolds Week Professors


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    REYNOLDS WEEK 2011: Resources, recordings

    ARCHIVE: Blog for Reynolds Week 2011: 30 fellows, 4 days of intensive study in business journalism
    Two sets of 15 fellows will attend separate, all-expenses-paid seminars Jan. 4-7, 2011, at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication in Phoenix.

    Reynolds Week Professors


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    R. Thomas Herman shares the secrets for better business reporting

    R. Thomas Herman, who worked at The Wall Street Journal for 41 years, shares his tips for success on the business beat. From developing a tickler list to a document mind, this veteran has lots of tactics to help improve your coverage.

    Herman, who has taught at both Yale and Columbia Journalism School, was a Business Journalism Professors fellow this week during Reynolds Business Journalism Week 2011.

    R. Thomas Herman shares the secrets for better business reporting from Reynolds Center on Vimeo.

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    Day 4: Reynolds Week resources

    Resources – video recordings, slideshows and handouts – from Day 4 of Reynolds Business Journalism Week 2011, a four-day seminar for business journalists and business journalism professors.

    PROFESSORS SEMINARS

    Panel Discussion: What Editors ExpectIlana Lowery, Kathy Tulumello, Linda Austin and Jodi Schneider

    Preparing for the Job MarketSchneider

    STRICTLY FINANCIALS SEMINARS

    Financial Markets in 2011: Where are the Stories?Gary Trennepohl

    Financial Markets in 2011: Where are the Stories? (Continued)Trennepohl

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    Alicia Wallace shares her tips for organizing the biz beat

    Several years ago there were a group of reporters covering business at the Daily Camera in Boulder, Colo.

    Now it’s just Alicia Wallace.

    The award-winning journalist has the responsibility of covering business for the publication by herself, a job that requires someone who is organized and strategic. To keep on top of her beat, Wallace has developed different methods to guide her daily reporting. If not, she could miss a breaking story or a national trend playing out in her backyard.

    Since Wallace is in Phoenix this week studding financials, she offered to share her top tips for plotting out your coverage.

    Alicia Wallace shares her tips for organizing the biz beat from Reynolds Center on Vimeo.

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    Watch the Barlett & Steele chat on investigative business journalism

    Earlier this week, we had a chance to hear the inside stories behind the work of this year’s winners of the Barlett & Steele Awards for Investigative Business Journalism.

    If you missed the live video of the panel discussion that focused on investigative business journalism, we’ve posted it here. The panel, which was moderated by Reynolds Center President Andrew Leckey, featured freelance reporter Murray Waas, John Fauber of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and investigative reporter Jim Steele.

    2010 Barlett & Steele Awards Luncheon from Reynolds Center on Vimeo.

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    Covering investing, retirement: Move beyond the Dow

    You must look at historical trends to really tell the story of the stock market.

    Sounds simple, but it’s a complicated matter.

    “Markets are going to be volatile and it’s really hard to predict,” said Gary Trennepohl, president of the University of Oklahoma-Tulsa, to 15 fellows at Reynolds Business Journalism Week in Phoenix.

    Writing for the popular press, I think the fear index or VIX, the CBOE Volatility Index, can be interesting. Yet the fear index is just one of many ways to measure what is happening or may happen to the market.

    Gary Trennepohl Strictly Financials

    Gary Trennepohl, president of Oklahoma State University-Tulsa, leads a session during the 2010 Strictly Financials Seminar in Phoenix. Photo by Robin J. Phillips

    “Volatility is highly volatile,” Trennepohl said with a smile.

    The fellows spent 4 days learning about covering financials in a Strictly Financials seminar put on by the Reynolds Center for Business Journalism.

    During the morning session, Trennepohl stressed that there is no simple way to look at or report on the market.

    Sometimes professionals make sweeping statements trying to capture what the market’s doing …  make statements like “the market was lost in the 2000s. That’s not necessarily true. You have to look closer at the index.”

    “You have to dig deeper,” Trennepohl said.

    On retirement investing.

    Timing is very important in retirement investment.

    “I don’t want to say it’s a matter of luck, but it’s really a matter of luck.”

    On longterm investing.

    “When somebody promises you that you’ll make 20 or 30 percent in the market, that’s bogus. You’re not going to get that over time.”

    Global connections

    “Technology is changing everything.  There’s a whole lot more data and information available and its really bring all of these markets together. Policies set in the Eurozone translate quickly back to the U.S.”

    “Investors need to get a much broader focus and invest in more than just the U.S. markets.”

    And on a personal note.

    “Time is on your side when you are young but it’s against you when you’re old.  So start saving now so you have a greater probability of gaining over time.”

    Some articles, Tennepohl suggested to learn more:

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    Day 3: Reynolds Week resources

    Resources – video recordings, slideshows and handouts – from Day 3 of Reynolds Business Journalism Week 2011, a four-day seminar for business journalists and business journalism professors.

    SOCIAL MEDIA Q&A

    What You Need to Know about Using Social Media in Business JournalismRobin J. Phillips, BusinessJournalism.org M.E.

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    Quick chat with John Duchneskie on visual storytelling

    John Duchneskie, the graphics editor at The Philadelphia Inquirer, explains why it’s important for business journalists to consider visual elements early in the reporting process. Instead of waiting until the end to chat with the graphics desk, he said a reporter’s best bet for a strong story is to start the visual conversation from the beginning.

    Duchneskie is spending the week in Phoenix studying financials as a fellow in the Reynolds Center’s Strictly Financials seminar.

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    Dig inside the mind to find the inner personality of your business stories

    Alan Deutschman

    Alan Deutschman, a Reynolds Endowed Chair in Business Journalism atthe University of Nevada, Reno, leads a session on adding personality into business coverage.

    In his journalism career, Alan Deutschman wrote stories for some of the most notable publications around –  Fortune, GQ, New York Magazine, Fast Company and Vanity Fair.

    But his next venture as the Reynolds Endowed Chair in Business Journalism at the Donald W. Reynolds School of Journalism at the University of Nevada, Reno, forced his mind to go back to the very beginning.

    Deutschman is now faced with the challenge of translating his years of experience on the business beat to valuable lessons for the next generation of financial journalists.

    The group of fellows in our Business Journalism Professor group have the same mission and are spending the week finding ways to enhance their business journalism classes.

    Together they are charting best practices to guide the future crop of reporters.

    Deutschman’s new venture into academia had him pondering an important question – what knowledge did he wish he knew when starting out his career as a business journalist?

    “It wasn’t business. It wasn’t economics. It wasn’t finance,” he said. “It was psychology.”

    Deutschman quickly realized that he was missing the bigger picture in his stories. Sure he jotted down interesting details – like how a corporate executive sported shorts because he just finished a beach volleyball game – but he didn’t explore the deeper force of what was driving the characters in his stories.

    So he began to study psychology.

    “I became facinated by what we as journalists could learn from these branches of psychology that would help us learn about the people we write about,”  Deutschman said.

    If you’re wondering if you should take the plunge into exploring what drives the powerful executives on your beat, consider Deutschman’s three reasons why psychology is relevant for the business beat:

    1. “When you look at business figures, as journalists we need to know what are they up to and if we can trust them?”

    2.  “The psychology of the leaders in a company forms the entire culture of the organization. It creates the DNA that replicates even as the corporation becomes quite large.”

    3. “Power corrupts. Or perhaps corruption helps people get into a position of power…Hardly any of the executives are immune to the effects of power, money and influence.”