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Reynolds Institute to train journalists, educators in Business Journalism

November 6, 2015

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Former Forbes publisher Jeff Cunningham and Pearl Meyer Partners Managing Director Jannice Koors instruct the 2015 Reynolds fellows at Reynolds Week in Business Journalism.
Former Forbes publisher Jeff Cunningham and Pearl Meyer Partners Managing Director Jannice Koors instruct the 2015 Reynolds fellows at Reynolds Week in Business Journalism.

Top journalists and college professors from around the country will gather in Phoenix this January to learn how to do and teach business journalism better.

The annual Reynolds Week in Business Journalism training will take place Jan 3-6 at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication on Arizona State University’s Downtown Phoenix Campus.

Seventeen reporters from news organizations that include USA Today, The Washington Post and U.S. News and World Report, will attend sessions on incorporating economic and census data into stories, building business investigations and covering business in their communities. They also will hear from experts on covering campaign finance, money in sports, economics of immigration and the business of marijuana.

They will be joined by nine educators who will learn business basics as well as tools and techniques for teaching business journalism to college students.

Speakers and trainers include Fernanda Santos, Phoenix Bureau Chief of The New York Times, Ilana Lowery, editor of the Phoenix Business Journal and John Corrigan of the Los Angeles Times.

Reynolds Week participants were selected in a competitive process and are supported by $1,500 fellowships provided by the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, which cover tuition, hotel and meals. They join 230 other journalists and professors who have participated in the annual training program since 2007.

This year’s fellows are:

Journalists:
Elizabeth Weise, USA Today
Schuyler Velasco, The Christian Science Monitor
Michael Fletcher, The Washington Post
Andrew Soergel, U.S. News & World Report
Rickey Bevington, Georgia Public Broadcasting
Ally Marotti, Crain’s Chicago Business
Eric Toll, Phoenix Business Journal
Rachel Lerman, The Seattle Times
Timothy Sheehan, The Fresno Bee
Luis Carrasco, Arizona Daily Star
Greg Trotter, Chicago Tribune
Joel Aschbrenner, The Des Moines Register
Jared Council, Indianapolis Business Journal
Molly Young, The Oregonian
Teddy Nykiel, NerdWallet
Bonnie McGeer, American Banker
Claes Bell, Bankrate.com

Educators:
David Copeland, Bridgewater State University
Zac Gershberg, Idaho State University
Desiree Hanford, Northwestern University
Christina Leonard, Arizona State University
Amy Merrick, DePaul University
Jean Norman, Weber State University
Morufu Oyetope Oyekanmi, Osun State Polytechnic
Julie Serkosky, University of Connecticut
Terri Thompson, Columbia University

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Our New Look
The Reynolds Center for Business Journalism is starting 2023 with a new look that we hope better illustrates our core mission to provide accurate and authoritative resources about business journalism, in order to help both reporters and news consumers understand the importance of business news and to demystify the sometimes arcane topics it covers.
Businesses, markets, and economies move in cycles – ups and downs – which is why our new logo contains a “candlestick” chart representing increases as well as downturns, and serves as a reminder that volatility is an unavoidable attribute of modern life. But it’s also possible to prepare for volatility by being well informed, and informing the general public to help level the information playing field is the primary goal of business journalism. The Reynolds Center is committed to supporting that goal, which is why the candlestick pattern in our logo merges directly into the name of our founding sponsor, Donald W. Reynolds.
Our new logo comes with a shorter name. Business is borderless, and understanding the global links in supply chains, trade, and flows of funds and people is essential to make sense of our fast-paced, globalized world. So we’re dropping the word “National” from our name and will aim to provide content that is applicable to business news globally.
We hope you like the new look. Best wishes for 2023!