Donald W. Reynolds National Center For Business Journalism

Two Minute Tips

June 2017

7 tips for better business interviews

Last year, I joined two long-time business journalist colleagues of mine—Randy B. Hecht and Robert McGarvey—on a webcast hosted by the American Society of Business Publication Editors. We discussed how

Earnings Per Share and the value of a share don't necessarily go hand-in-hand. ("Long Dock Company Stock Certificate 1860s" by William Cresswell via Flickr, CC BY 2.0)

Earnings per share and share price

Market watchers analyze and discuss earnings per share (EPS) more than any other financial measure. Managers talk about EPS when they announce earnings and often feature EPS in annual reports. All

Percent of Balance 90+ Days Delinquent by Loan Type (Source: New York Fed Consumer Credit Panel/Eaquifax)

Covering household debt in your community

After the shock of the financial crisis, Americans began weaning themselves off plastic. In each of the 19 consecutive quarters since 2008, however, debt has been nudging its way back

Fewer editors in the newsroom mean that reporters have to step up their self-editing game. (Image from "3844328" via Pixabay, CCO Public Domain)

Accuracy checklist for journalists

Fewer copy editors in the newsroom—in fact, fewer editors in general—means that reporters must increasingly perform that function themselves. Before submitting a story or hitting “publish” on a website’s CMS, take

A recently discovered Jackson Pollack will be auctions in Scottsdale, AZ. (Image by "Dun.can" via Flickr, CC BY 2.0)

The business of art: How to cover local auctions

Shock swept the art world last month when a 1982 painting by late graffiti artist and neo-expressionist Jean-Michel Basquiat sold at Sotheby’s for $110.5 million. It was the highest price ever

Companies use a couple of methods to do their sums. Journalists need to consider both. ("Abacus" image by JD via Flickr, CC BY 2.0)

GAAP vs. Pro-Forma Earnings

A company’s finances are sometimes presented in two forms: a more conservative form, which falls in line with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and a more favorable form, called pro-forma.

Consumer travel: Three summer story angles

Now that the summer travel season is in full swing, business reporters across the country have likely retread topics such as how the local tourism bureau plans to attract visitors as well

Explaining blockchain

It’s been said that the companies driving innovation and forging new trails in the tech world are not run by idealistic Stanford dropouts. The true digital pioneers are in the porn business.

Even genealogical records can provide great clues for business stories. ("Jenkins Genealogy 1939-40, A Sketch of Forebears" by John M. via Flicker, CC BY-SA 2.0)

Surprising sources for business stories

Finding a new source of information is always good for business journalists. There are plenty of obvious ones, including Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Hoovers and Google Finance. To advance your reporting, you’ll want to go

Looking at a company's finances include tangible assets: PP&E. (Image by "Barescar90" via Pixabay, CCO Public Domain)

Property, plant & equipment

Property, plant and equipment is a large asset for many companies. Here’s help in analyzing PP&E figures on a balance sheet. The basics of PP&E PP&E consists of tangible assets

With the possibility of new rules on retirement funds, business reporters should tackle the topic. ("Look left, look right" image by Franck Michel via Flickr, CC BY 2.0)

New rules on retirement savings

“Auto-IRA” plans are now in legal limbo for millions of U.S. workers. President Trump recently repealed a 2016 resolution from the U.S. Department of Labor that encouraged states to automatically enroll

FOIA user’s guide: Six key sources

When a city bids to host the Olympics, it’s big sports news. It’s also a massive business story. Billions are invested, which means companies will vie for it and taxpayers often

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