Two Minute Tips

Erik Sherman

Erik is an independent journalist and author who primarily covers business, economics, finance, technology, politics, and legal/regulatory, while elegantly expressing the complex and often incorporating data analysis.

My Latest Articles

Stop falling for off-the-record interviews

Hearing from people who ask for interviews off the record has become a regular part of business journalism. In my experience, that’s most frequently done by in-house corporate PR people

Don’t use sources who are phonies

If your experience reporting is anything like mine, you’ll constantly hear from people who want to be sources and their reps. It may be in response to a query you

Watch sources for lying

Finding good sources can be a challenge and chances are you spend a good amount of time looking for them. You want someone with knowledge of the topic, perhaps special

Embrace creativity in all its forms in your work

All writers—business journalists, too—prize creativity. Story structure, phrasing, ledes and kickers. No matter how dry the topic, you likely want to make the result as engaging and even artistic as

Big problems with big data and AI

Big data and artificial intelligence are tremendously popular in business. Everybody is using “machine learning” or “deep learning” or “analytics” or “neural networks” or any of the buzzwords that pop

Always take projections with a shaker of salt

Covering business means you’re always hearing estimates, projections, and predictions from companies, industry analysts, think tanks, and others. The view as to where things might go can be helpful in

Pin down interview subjects

In business journalism, you can safely bet that most—almost all, even—interview subjects have an agenda. Company executives want to project an image that will satisfy shareholders, customers, and the executive’s

Be sure vendors have what they claim

A long time ago, I was in a software distribution business with a large audience of software developers and engineers. Much of my time was spent plenty talking to vendors.

Check a subject’s political connections

We’re coming up—again!—on an election cycle which has become practically a full-time business. This is a period where political reporters have at it. A run-up to an election is also

Get Two Minute Tips For Business Journalism Delivered To Your Email Every Tuesday

Two Minute Tips

Every Tuesday we send out a quick-read email with tips for business journalism. Sign up now and get one Tuesday.

Our New Look
The Reynolds Center for Business Journalism is starting 2023 with a new look that we hope better illustrates our core mission to provide accurate and authoritative resources about business journalism, in order to help both reporters and news consumers understand the importance of business news and to demystify the sometimes arcane topics it covers.
Businesses, markets, and economies move in cycles – ups and downs – which is why our new logo contains a “candlestick” chart representing increases as well as downturns, and serves as a reminder that volatility is an unavoidable attribute of modern life. But it’s also possible to prepare for volatility by being well informed, and informing the general public to help level the information playing field is the primary goal of business journalism. The Reynolds Center is committed to supporting that goal, which is why the candlestick pattern in our logo merges directly into the name of our founding sponsor, Donald W. Reynolds.
Our new logo comes with a shorter name. Business is borderless, and understanding the global links in supply chains, trade, and flows of funds and people is essential to make sense of our fast-paced, globalized world. So we’re dropping the word “National” from our name and will aim to provide content that is applicable to business news globally.
We hope you like the new look. Best wishes for 2023!