Two Minute Tips

Journalism Tools

Even genealogical records can provide great clues for business stories. ("Jenkins Genealogy 1939-40, A Sketch of Forebears" by John M. via Flicker, CC BY-SA 2.0)

Surprising sources for business stories

Finding a new source of information is always good for business journalists. There are plenty of obvious ones, including Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Hoovers and Google Finance. To advance your reporting, you’ll want to go

Three databases: Local learning trends

Newsworthy headlines about schools often report on the quality of a state’s education, or the status of funding that public schools are receiving from the government. However, trends local education also

Business journalists have instant access to an immense pool of data and resources. We've got 11 online tools to bookmark.

11 top online tools for business journalists

Tools, data, and other resources can help make your work faster, more accurate, and better. Here are 11 online tools (all with free versions) that are worth a look. Congress.gov

Finding data on exported goods through Export.gov

The International Trade Administration provides reliable first-hand data for business journalists looking into trade affairs, which you can find at export.gov. One of the most important tools found on the

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10 great databases you can mine for story ideas

This workshop was held in June 2016. You can view the presentation on Slideshare below. Wondering where to obtain data for your business and investigative stories? Data journalist Steve Doig,

How to Cover Money Podcast

Databases you can use

In this week’s episode, Steve Doig, data journalist and Knight Chair in Journalism at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and Evan Wyloge, senior reporter at the Arizona

Engagement resources for business journalists

Is your newsroom looking to interact more with your audience? Create better timelines, charts and graphics? Be more efficient in your work individually and within a team? Here are some

Data resources for business journalists

  Data isn’t just for investigative reporters. Numbers are the basis for any business story. Where to find them? Try these sources. Google Public Data Google has a free public

5 online tools to improve your reporting

  1. FOIA Machine FOIA Machine is a website that helps you speed up and simplify the process of submitting a Freedom of Information Access request. It hosts the standard

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Our New Look
The Reynolds Center for Business Journalism is starting 2023 with a new look that we hope better illustrates our core mission to provide accurate and authoritative resources about business journalism, in order to help both reporters and news consumers understand the importance of business news and to demystify the sometimes arcane topics it covers.
Businesses, markets, and economies move in cycles – ups and downs – which is why our new logo contains a “candlestick” chart representing increases as well as downturns, and serves as a reminder that volatility is an unavoidable attribute of modern life. But it’s also possible to prepare for volatility by being well informed, and informing the general public to help level the information playing field is the primary goal of business journalism. The Reynolds Center is committed to supporting that goal, which is why the candlestick pattern in our logo merges directly into the name of our founding sponsor, Donald W. Reynolds.
Our new logo comes with a shorter name. Business is borderless, and understanding the global links in supply chains, trade, and flows of funds and people is essential to make sense of our fast-paced, globalized world. So we’re dropping the word “National” from our name and will aim to provide content that is applicable to business news globally.
We hope you like the new look. Best wishes for 2023!