Two Minute Tips

Personal finance

Help your readers avoid financial scams: Part II

As reported in the first part of a series on the financial exploitation of U.S. seniors, financial scams targeting U.S. seniors will continue to grow as the U.S. population ages.

Help your readers avoid financial scams: Part I

As the elderly population of the United States continues to grow, there’s a sizable personal finance story for business staff to report separately, or develop into a blockbuster series: the

Covering personal finance in the classroom

April is Financial Literacy Month, but personal finance education is a timely topic year-round (for instance, back to school, college admissions season, graduation season). The Council for Economic Education reports that 21

The costs of emergency medical transportation

Emergency transport, such as ambulances, can save lives–but not without a price. Although these services are solely run by the government in countries like the U.K., the situation is different

Are Americans overly confident about retirement?

That’s the question business reporters should follow, after studying a number of recent surveys that are making headlines. Those responding to Charles Schwab’s 401(k) Participant Study say they’ll need $1.7

new health and wealth data

3 (seriously simple) ways to save for an emergency

The lack of U.S. emergency savings is a news story that consistently receives attention, but the statistics just aren’t budging. According to the Federal Reserve Board, four in every 10

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Our New Look
The Reynolds Center for Business Journalism is starting 2023 with a new look that we hope better illustrates our core mission to provide accurate and authoritative resources about business journalism, in order to help both reporters and news consumers understand the importance of business news and to demystify the sometimes arcane topics it covers.
Businesses, markets, and economies move in cycles – ups and downs – which is why our new logo contains a “candlestick” chart representing increases as well as downturns, and serves as a reminder that volatility is an unavoidable attribute of modern life. But it’s also possible to prepare for volatility by being well informed, and informing the general public to help level the information playing field is the primary goal of business journalism. The Reynolds Center is committed to supporting that goal, which is why the candlestick pattern in our logo merges directly into the name of our founding sponsor, Donald W. Reynolds.
Our new logo comes with a shorter name. Business is borderless, and understanding the global links in supply chains, trade, and flows of funds and people is essential to make sense of our fast-paced, globalized world. So we’re dropping the word “National” from our name and will aim to provide content that is applicable to business news globally.
We hope you like the new look. Best wishes for 2023!