Donald W. Reynolds National Center For Business Journalism

Two Minute Tips

Interviewing Tips

Pin down interview subjects

In business journalism, you can safely bet that most—almost all, even—interview subjects have an agenda. Company executives want to project an image that will satisfy shareholders, customers, and the executive’s

Be sure vendors have what they claim

A long time ago, I was in a software distribution business with a large audience of software developers and engineers. Much of my time was spent plenty talking to vendors.

The fundamentals of good journalism are more important than ever. Here's a refresher. (Merrian-Webster Dictionaries image by Merrian Webster via Flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0)

Unimpeachable sources

I’m a big fan of the bells and whistles of modern storytelling, such as 360 journalism and data visualization. I’m equally enthusiastic about delving into audience analytics. But cutting-edge reporting

How to check a source’s statistics

You’ve probably noticed that PR departments and agencies often try to make their pitches seem like authentic news. To that end, many will toss in statistics and other numbers. In

5 Services matching reporters with expert sources

Many journalists use services like Help a Reporter Out (HARO) and Profnet to track down experts or real-people sources. But these large, general-interest services have their shortcomings, as Erik Sherman pointed out

How to find interview sources on social media

We all know the feeling: Deadlines are approaching and you need sources. Whether you’re looking for company employees to interview, want to talk to a business’s customers or are hunting

7 tips for better business interviews

Last year, I joined two long-time business journalist colleagues of mine—Randy B. Hecht and Robert McGarvey—on a webcast hosted by the American Society of Business Publication Editors. We discussed how

FOIA user’s guide: 6 key sources

When a city bids to host the Olympics, it’s big sports news. It’s also a massive business story. Billions are invested, which means companies will vie for it and taxpayers often

Business journalists need to learn how to navigate the tricky world of off-the-record sources. (Image by Ryan McGuire via Pixabay, CCO Public Domain)

How to navigate off-the-record requests

Questions about material delivered by anonymous sources have fueled recent political stories. But off-the-record promises are thorny for business journalists as well. People might reasonably ask to go off the

When sources say stupid things

Friends don’t let friends write drunk, unless one is at the Algonquin Round Table. But what happens when sources say something demonstrably stupid? Do you put in in the paper

Tampa Bay Times’ Ivan Penn on the energy beat

Ivan Penn, Tampa Bay Times reporter, started his journalism career as a TV weatherman—in elementary school for an in-house cable program. His father, an avid consumer of the news, inspired

Background, off the record and you

The most authoritative quotes come from on-the-record named sources, preferably senior executives, labor leaders, scientists, economists and workers with direct knowledge of the news. But there will come times in

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